King Edward VII’s Broadway Visit – 9th July 1905

On Sunday 9th July 1905, King Edward VII (known throughout his life as Bertie) visited Broadway. His Majesty had travelled by train to Moreton-in-Marsh the previous afternoon. He had spent the Saturday night with Lord Redesdale1 at Batsford Park with fellow guests: his equerry Major G. Lindsay Holford,  CVO, CIE, the Austrian Ambassador Count Albert von Mensdorff-Pouilly-Dietrichstein, Lord Esher2, the Dowager Countess of Dudley, Mr and Mrs Joseph Chamberlain, Mr and Mrs George Keppel3, Lady Airlie, Lady Edith Ogilvy, the Hon. Mr and Mrs David Mitford, the Hon. Jack Mitford, the Hon. Rupert Mitford, the Hon. Frances Mitford, the Hon. Iris Mitford and the Hon. Daphne Mitford.

On Sunday morning,  HM The King attended the morning service at Batsford Church conducted by the Rev. Spencer Jones, which was so popular that the service was by ticketed entry only, all 120 seats in the church were full.

At 2.30pm, His Majesty left Batsford in his own car for an afternoon’s drive around the North Cotswolds. King Edward was driven through nearby Dorn via Neighbridge. It is reported that Neighbridge is where Charles II, after the Battle of Worcester in September 1651, took refuge in an oak tree and hid his horse under the bridge. The approaching Parliamentarians frightened the horse which neighed and galloped off with the soldiers in pursuit whilst King Charles made his escape in the opposite direction.

His Majesty proceeded from Dorn to Chipping Campden and on through Weston Subedge and Willersey before arriving in Broadway where he was met by flag waving crowds lining the village’s High Street. From Broadway The King proceeded to Stanway House where he had tea with Lord and Lady Elcho (Hugo Richard Charteris, Lord Elcho, was the 11th Earl of Wemyss and 7th Earl of March DL) before returning to Batsford via Ford and Bourton-on-the-Hill.

 

Notes:
1. Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale, GCVO, KCB.
2. Reginald Baliol Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher GCVO, KCB, PC, DL.
3. Mrs Keppel, Alice Frederica Keppel (née Edmonstone), was a British Society hostess and long-time mistress of King Edward VII. Alice Keppel was married to Lieutenant-Colonel the Hon. George Keppel, MVO. Lord Esher wrote to his son, Maurice, from Batsford Park in July 1905: The King is perfectly happy. His admiration of Mrs K. is almost pathetic. He watches her all day and is never happy when she’s talking to someone else…….she is never bored of him and always good-humoured. So, her hold over him grows.

Broadway Pebbles

Broadway Pebbles: Look out there’s a Painted Pebble about!

Whilst staying in one of our Cotswold holiday cottages in 2018 keep a keen eye out for a Broadway Pebble. It’s a little like geocaching, minus the technology, and is a craze that is spreading across the country.

Several decorated pebbles have been hidden in and around the village. If you find one share you find on Twitter (@broadwaypebbles and @broadwaymanor) or on Instagram (#broadwaypebbles), and afterwards re-hide the pebble so that somebody else can join in the fun.

Perhaps you would like to hide a decorated pebble or two in the village whilst holidaying here? Remember to hide your painted pebble in a public and safe place. Are there some hidden in our grounds here at Broadway Manor Cottages for our guests to find?

Broadway Pebbles, a great way to get the family out and about in the village and having fun.

 

 

 

Learn a Traditional Rural Skill in the Cotswolds

Learn a Traditional Rural Skill in the Cotswolds

Whilst holidaying in the Cotswolds in one of our Cotswold holiday cottages, why not combine your stay with learning a traditional rural skill? In the Cotswolds AONB, the Cotswolds Conservation Board run a number of courses throughout the year on which participants can learn hedgelaying techniques, how to build a drystone wall, how to prepare and use lime mortar, how to use green woodworking techniques to make wooden objects from unseasoned timber or try their hand at woodland coppicing, thatching, blacksmithing or stone carving.

Our Cotswold holiday cottages in Broadway are ideally located as a place to stay in the beautiful Cotswold countryside whilst learning an interesting and unusual traditional rural skill.

Courses run from January through to October through the Cotswolds. Details of available courses in 2018 can be seen at: www.cotswoldruralskills.org. Contact us for details of our Cotswold holiday cottages in Broadway.

Beautiful Broadway, a very old English Village

Beautiful Broadway: A Very Old English Village

Henry James, an American writer who settled in England, was a frequent visitor to the Cotswolds. James described Broadway in 1889 as a ‘very old English village, lying amongst its meadows and hedges, in the very heart of the country, in the hollow of the green hills of Worcestershire’ and that ‘much of the land about it are in short the perfection of the old English rural tradition.’

The geese on the village green that James went on to describe may be missing today but the village’s ‘broad way’ lined with horse chestnut trees and honey-coloured Cotswold limestone buildings, many dating back to the 16th century with some parts of The Lygon Arms appearing to date back to the 14th century, still does not fail to charm visitors to this most picturesque and beautiful English village.

Broadway still delights. The village is a centre for the arts steeped in history with a unique heritage of a world-famous colony of artists, writers and musicians collectively known as the Broadway Colony who worked and visited the village during the late 19th century. The Colony included Henry James and Frank Millet, John Singer Sargent, Alfred Parsons, Mary Anderson de Navarro to name just a few.

Alfred Parsons RA, RI, PRWS (1847-1920)

My interest in gardening grew after obtaining an RHS Certificate in Horticulture which then led me to a qualification in Garden Design in 2005. During my studies I studied many great British garden designers including Alfred Parsons, Gertrude Jekyll (who was famous for her herbaceous borders and greatly influenced by the Arts & Crafts Movement), Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe, landscaper Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown and Rosemary Verey to name a few. I was also fortunate to visit many of the gardens which were originally designed by these great designers, many of which are located in the Cotswolds. I now live in the picturesque village of Broadway in the North Cotswolds which was also home to Alfred Parsons in the late 19th century.

Alfred William Parsons, English landscape painter, watercolourist and illustrator was born on 2nd December 1847 in Laverton near Frome, Somerset. Alfred was the second of seventeen children of Dr Joshua Parsons and Letitia Harriet Parsons (née Williams). His father was a doctor with a keen interest in growing alpines which no doubt sparked Alfred’s early interest in plants and gardening.

Although Parsons started work in 1865 as a clerk in the Post Office after 2 years he left to pursue studies at the Kensington School of Art. Parsons.  went on to become well known as a fine botanical painter, engraver and painter of English rural landscapes exhibiting at various galleries including the Royal Academy (1887), the Grosvenor and the New Gallery.

Whilst living in London, Parsons shared his home with Edwin Austin Abbey and they painted alongside each other in adjacent studios. Parsons was introduced to Broadway by his friend Lawrence Dutton who was a frequent visitor to Broadway Tower, the holiday retreat of William Morris, Dante Rosetti and Edward Burne-Jones. Parsons was so taken with the village that he decided to move out of London joining the Broadway colony of artists in residence in Broadway in the late 1880s. Parsons became a good friend of both John Singer Sargent and Francis Davis Millet (Frank and Elizabeth Millet named their youngest son John Alfred Parsons Millet after both Parsons and Sargent) and introduced Abbey to the Broadway colony.

Parsons also met Henry Harper through the Broadway Colony which led to him illustrating several editions of Harper’s New Monthly Magazine (Harper’s Magazine). Parsons also worked with his good friend Abbey on illustrations of Robert Herrick’s poems and supplied illustrations for Henry James’ essays on Broadway. He also illustrated songs, poems as well as travelogues.

Parsons’ fine watercolours for botanist Ellen Ann Willmott and illustrations for William Robinson, author of The Wild Garden, encouraged Parsons interest and passion in garden design. Parsons had always been an avid gardener and horticulturist and was once a judge at the Chelsea flower show.  Parsons went on to design several great gardens including Great Chalfield Manor, an Arts and Crafts garden near Melksham, Wightwick Manor near Wolverhampton and Lamb House, Rye, home of Henry James from 1898 to 1916. Parsons also designed several gardens in Broadway including Court Farm, home of Mary Anderson (Mme de Navarro), Broadway Court with its wonderful yew topiary, Bell Farm, home of the pianist and composer Miss Maud Valerie White and eventually his own at Luggershill.

Parsons became President of the Society of Painters in Water Colour in 1905 and full RA in 1911 on the acceptance of his diploma work, the oil painting Orange Lilies which Parsons painted in his back garden at Luggershill. Orange Lilies was on public display in the ‘Exhibition of the work of John Singer Sargent and members of the Broadway Colony’ at Trinity House, Broadway, during the 2010 Broadway Arts Festival. Parsons died at Luggershill (now known as Luggers Hall), Broadway, Worcestershire, on 16th January 1920.

The next Broadway Arts Festival will take place from 8th – 17th June 2018 and will offer a varied schedule of events including talks, art workshops, demonstrations and exhibitions, music and theatre. The village is a centre for the arts with its unique heritage of the world-famous colony of American artists, writers and musicians – the Broadway Colony.

If you are interested in staying in Broadway during the 2018 Festival please visit our Cotswold holiday cottages in Broadway, just a few minutes’ walk from the centre of the village.

Christmas 2017 Late Night Shopping Evenings

Enjoy a fun festive evening in the Cotswolds. Soak up the seasonal atmosphere and entertainment during Broadway’s late night Christmas shopping evenings which will take place in Broadway on Friday 24th November and Friday 1st December 2017 from 5.30pm to 8.30pm.

Broadway’s High Street will be lined with trees full of sparkling Christmas lights on both evenings. There will be music and street entertainers, Santa’s Grotto, mulled wine and mince pies to enjoy whilst shopping in Broadway’s independent shops and galleries.

To stay in one of our Cotswold holiday cottages in Broadway over one of the Christmas late night shopping weekends please contact us.

 

Debbie Williamson
Broadway Manor Cottages